Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests

Here the community can nominate articles to be selected as "Today's featured article" (TFA) on the main page. The TFA section aims to highlight the range of articles that have "featured article" status, from Art and architecture through to Warfare, and wherever possible it tries to avoid similar topics appearing too close together without good reason. Requests are not the only factor in scheduling the TFA (see Choosing Today's Featured Article); the final decision rests with the TFA coordinators Dank, Jimfbleak, Ealdgyth and Wehwalt, who also select TFAs for dates where no suggestions are put forward). Please confine requests to this page, and remember that community endorsement on this page does not necessarily mean the article will appear on the requested date.

  • The article must be a featured article. Editors who are not significant contributors to the article should consult regular editors of the article before nominating it for TFAR.
  • The article must not have appeared as TFA before (see the list of possibilities here), except that:
  • The TFA coordinators may choose to fill up to two slots each week with FAs that have previously been on the main page, so long as the prior appearance was at least five years ago. The coordinators will invite discussion on general selection criteria for rerunnable TFAs, and aim to make individual selections within those criteria.
  • The request must be either for a specific date within the next 30 days that have not yet been scheduled (10 spaces), or a non-specific date (4 spaces). If a section is full, you can wait for a vacancy, or ask the coordinators for advice. The template {{@TFA}} can be used in a message to "ping" the coordinators through the notification system.

If you have an exceptional request that deviates from these instructions (for example, an article making a second appearance as TFA, or a "double-header"), please discuss the matter with the TFA coordinators beforehand.

It can be helpful to add the article to the pending requests template up to 1 year before the requested date. This does not guarantee selection, but does help others see what nominations may be forthcoming. Requestors should still nominate the article here during the 30-day timeframe.

Purge the cache to refresh this page

 – Check TFAR nominations for dead links

 – Alt text

Featured content:

Featured article candidates (FAC)

Featured article review (FAR)

Today's featured article (TFA):

Featured article tools:

How to post a new nomination:

I.
Create the nomination subpage.

In the box below, enter the full name of the article you are nominating (without using any brackets around the article's name) and click the button to create your nomination page.


II.
Write the nomination.

On that nomination page, fill out as many of the relevant parts of the pre-loaded {{TFAR nom}} template as you can, then save the page.

Your nomination should mention:

  • when the last similar article was, since this helps towards diversity on the main page (browsing Wikipedia:Today's featured article/recent TFAs will help you find out);
  • when the article was promoted to FA status (since older articles may need extra checks);
  • and (for date-specific nominations) the article's relevance for the requested date.
III.
Write the blurb.
For Featured Articles promoted on or after October 1, 2015, copy in the blurb that appears on the talk page of the FAC nomination (that's the page linked from "it has been identified" at the top of the article's talk page), save it, and then edit as needed. For older FAs, you're welcome to create your own TFA text as a summary of the lead section, or you can ask for assistance at WT:TFAR. We use one paragraph only, with no reference tags or alternative names; the only thing bolded is the first link to the article title. The length when previewed (including spaces) is between 925 and 1025 characters, or more when no free-use image can be found. Fair use images are not allowed.
IV.
Post at TFAR.

After you have created the nomination page, add it here under a level-3 heading for the preferred date (or under a free non-specific date header). To do this, add (replacing "ARTICLE TITLE" with the name of your nominated article):
===February 29===
{{Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests/ARTICLE TITLE}}

Nominations are ordered by requested date below the summary chart. More than one article can be nominated for the same date.

It would also then be helpful to add the nomination to the summary chart, following the examples there. Please include the name of the article that you are nominating in your edit summary.

If you are not one of the article's primary editors, please then notify the primary editors of the TFA nomination; if primary editors are no longer active, please add a message to the article talk page.

Scheduling:

In the absence of exceptional circumstances, TFAs are scheduled in date order, not according to how long nominations have been open or how many supportive comments they have. So, for example, January 31 will not be scheduled until January 30 has been scheduled (by TFAR nomination or otherwise).


Summary chart

Currently accepting requests from March 1 to March 31.

Date Article Notes Supports Opposes
Nonspecific 1 Acra (fortress) 1 3
Nonspecific 2
Nonspecific 3
Nonspecific 4
March 3 Tourette syndrome US National Advocacy Day, Washington, D.C. 4
March 8 Inter-Allied Women's Conference IWD 6
March 27 Samuel Mulledy Mulledy's birthday 1

Tally may not be up to date. The nominator is included in the number of supporters.

Nonspecific date nominations

Nonspecific date 1

Acra (fortress)

Proposed remnants of the Acra.

The Acra was a fortified compound in Jerusalem built by Antiochus Epiphanes, ruler of the Seleucid Empire, following his sack of the city in 168 BCE. The fortress played a significant role in the events surrounding the Maccabean Revolt and the formation of the Hasmonean Kingdom. It was destroyed by Simon Thassi during this struggle. The exact location of the Acra, critical to understanding Hellenistic Jerusalem, had been a matter of lengthy discussions. Historians and archaeologists had proposed various sites around Jerusalem, relying mainly on conclusions drawn from literary evidence. This approach began to change in the light of excavations which commenced in the late 1960s. New discoveries had prompted reassessments of the ancient literary sources, Jerusalem's geography and previously discovered artifacts. In 2015, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced the likely discovery of the Acra in a different location, south-west of the Temple Mount and north-west of the City of David. (Full article...)

Nonspecific date 2

Nonspecific date 3

Nonspecific date 4

Specific date nominations

March 3

Tourette syndrome

Examples of tics

Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder which develops during childhood. It is characterized by tics such as blinking, coughing, sniffing, or facial movements that are a somewhat suppressible response to an unwanted urge. Once considered rare, Tourette's occurs in about 1% of people under eighteen, although many go undiagnosed or never seek medical care. There is no specific test for diagnosis and Tourette's is not always correctly identified because most cases are mild. Extreme cases in adulthood are rare and Tourette's does not affect intelligence or life expectancy. Education is an integral part of any treatment plan, and explanation and reassurance are often sufficient. The cause is believed to involve unknown genetic and environmental factors. The condition was named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who published an account of nine patients in 1885. (Full article...)

Fixing the video clip
  • I have no idea how or even who to ask to fix the arrow; Anthonyhcole got permission from the TSA to upload the video. SandyGeorgia (Talk) 22:37, 25 January 2020 (UTC)
    Maybe Colin knows something?  SandyGeorgia (Talk) 22:38, 25 January 2020 (UTC)
    I can't help with the arrow but, yes, Colin may - he knows a lot about images on Commons. Anthonyhcole (talk · contribs · email) 03:10, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    I don't think we can change the play icon as this is part of Wikipedia UI styling. Mucking about with that is fraught as it will be different for mobile and web and editors chosen skin. The thumbnail is particularly small though, and looking at other examples, it seems |size=200px would be reasonable. I've applied it above. -- Colin°Talk 10:57, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    That is already much better, thank you, Colin. Could the icon go to the right corner, to not disturb looking at the child? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:15, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    Ping Colin whether arrow can be moved right. Dank will this increased image size work on the main page? SandyGeorgia (Talk) 13:07, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    I don't know if that is possible. RexxS may know, but we need to be very careful not to break the main page for some users. -- Colin°Talk 13:11, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    Pinging David Levy. - Dank (push to talk) 13:14, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    David Levy, in the event the larger image is a problem, could that be solved by reducing the amount of text? I hope the video will draw the readers in more than the text. SandyGeorgia (Talk) 13:30, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    @Colin, Sandy, and Gerda: the position of the play button is set in MediaWiki:Common.css and so is common to all instances of the video player and we dare not alter it there. It's possible that we could override that just for our blurb by using WP:TemplateStyles to wrap the file in a template that swapped the left and right positions for .PopUpMediaTransform a .play-btn-large, but I'd have to experiment in a sandbox to see how feasible that is. If I can make that happen, I should be able to let you know within a day or so. Hope that helps. Cheers --RexxS (talk) 22:58, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    SandyGeorgia: Please see the alternative demonstrated below. But to answer your question, the image sizes used merely reflect our current conventions. Were there consensus to make an exception by increasing a TFA image's size (within reason), whether to trim the text would also be a matter of consensus. Aside from providing a heads-up, there's no need to worry about technical considerations. It always is possible to compensate by adding additional items to ITN and/or OTD. —David Levy 23:33, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
    @Colin, Sandy, and Gerda: Just a thought, if you don't mind using standard image syntax, you could specify a different still image like this:

Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder which develops during childhood. It is characterized by tics such as blinking, coughing, sniffing, or facial movements that are a somewhat suppressible response to an unwanted urge. Once considered rare, Tourette's occurs in about 1% of people under eighteen, although many go undiagnosed or never seek medical care. There is no specific test for diagnosis and Tourette's is not always correctly identified because most cases are mild. Extreme cases in adulthood are rare and Tourette's does not affect intelligence or life expectancy. Education is an integral part of any treatment plan, and explanation and reassurance are often sufficient. The cause is believed to involve unknown genetic and environmental factors. The condition was named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who published an account of nine patients in 1885. (Full article...)

You get the chance to select a frame at 1 second intervals. Is that a simpler alternative for when you use videos? --RexxS (talk) 23:26, 26 January 2020 (UTC)

RexxS: I just encountered an edit conflict while making the same suggestion (except for the thumbnail size/format and inclusion of a caption). Demonstration below. —David Levy 23:33, 26 January 2020 (UTC)

Wikipedia:Today's featured article/requests/demo

David Levy perfect. And now RexxS doesn't have to fiddle with the button. And now we have the size back at normal, I think? Could you install it in the main blurb, above? And could one of you work the same magic on the file in the article, at Tourette syndrome? SandyGeorgia (Talk) 00:02, 27 January 2020 (UTC)
I think I got it above, but someone will have to check. SandyGeorgia (Talk) 00:40, 27 January 2020 (UTC)
RexxS and David Levy fixed the clip, and it has been installed above. SandyGeorgia (Talk) 13:58, 29 January 2020 (UTC)
  • Support. A worthy topic, well written, and a nice change of pace. Gog the Mild (talk) 23:47, 27 January 2020 (UTC)

March 8

Inter-Allied Women's Conference

Inter-Allied Women's Conference, 27 February 1919

The Inter-Allied Women's Conference opened in Paris on 10 February 1919, several weeks after the start of the Paris Peace Conference, the meeting of the victorious Allies of World War I to set peace terms for the Central Powers. The women's conference was convened after the war to introduce women's issues to the process. On 18 January Marguerite de Witt-Schlumberger, vice-president of the International Woman Suffrage Alliance, asked Woodrow Wilson, the US president, to allow women to participate in the discussions that would inform the treaty negotiations. After first being rebuffed, suffragists were allowed to make a presentation before the Commission on International Labour Legislation, and on 10 April a resolution was presented to the League of Nations Commission. Though the women failed to achieve many of their aims, they gained the right for women to serve in the League of Nations organisation. (Full article...)

  • Most recent similar article(s): don't recall anything similar
  • Main editors: SusunW
  • Promoted: November 2019
  • Reasons for nomination: International Woman's Day
  • Support as nominator. Gerda Arendt (talk) 00:24, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
  • Per TFAR instructions, I've copied in the text from the blurb review ... it's fine to make edits to this version, but this is the starting point for edits, to preserve the reality and the appearance of a consensus-based process ... I've had repeated signals from the Main Page folks that this is important to them. Give it another shot, please, and keep it between 925 and 1025 characters, including the 18 for (Full article...). Of course, TFAR is another consensus-based process, so anything can be changed here. - Dank (push to talk) 00:36, 26 January 2020 (UTC) And ... thanks for your many years of fine work at TFAR. - Dank (push to talk) 01:54, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
  • Support. A fine article and just the sort of thing that Wikipedia should be putting on its main page. I have made a couple of tweaks, but feel free to revert. Gog the Mild (talk) 14:01, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
  • Support as one of the creators. Believe it is an especially significant international event and would be appropriate to be highlighted on international women's day. SusunW (talk) 16:46, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
  • Strong support for an article about a significant international event to appear on a significant day (International Woman's Day).--Rosiestep (talk) 17:07, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
  • Strong support for an article about a unique and important international event to appear on an appropriate day (International Woman's Day). ☕ Antiqueight chatter 21:55, 26 January 2020 (UTC)
  • Support per Gog and Gerda. Megalibrarygirl (talk) 17:45, 28 January 2020 (UTC)
  • I am concerned that large portions of this article are lists, that might be better placed at "List of women who ... " and then linked in the article. The meaningful text in the February section, as one example, is lost in a sea of blue. If the list of women was somehow separated, the meaningful text would be more accessible to the reader; the sea of blue would be reduced, and the list could be a table format that could be sorted by country, profession, organization, date attended, <whatever chosen>. There is more of same in March and April.
    This is not reason to oppose the article running TFA, but something it would be nice to see cleaned up. The February, March and April sections are not compelling reads (they are lists), and the compelling portions of those sections are overshadowed by the sea-of-blue lists.
    Alternately, an "Attendees" section could include the same information in table format. SandyGeorgia (Talk) 14:58, 29 January 2020 (UTC)

March 27

Samuel Mulledy

Portrait of Samuel Mulledy

Samuel Mulledy (1811–1866) was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit. Born in Virginia, he attended Georgetown College in Washington, D.C., where his brother, Thomas F. Mulledy was the president. He then entered the Society of Jesus in 1831 and proved to be a good student. He was sent to Rome for his higher studies, where he could study for the priesthood and be prepared to teach. Upon his return, he held senior academic positions, culminating in his appointment as president of Georgetown College in 1845. He reluctantly accepted the appointment, and requested to be relieved just eight months later. He continued to teach and minister, until his expulsion from the Jesuit order in 1850 due to alcoholism. For the next decade, he was a transient at churches in Massachusetts and New York, until being assigned to St. Lawrence O'Toole in New York City, where he remained for the rest of his life. On his deathbed, he successfully petitioned to be re-admitted to the Society of Jesus. (Full article...)

Original: Original:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Today's_featured_article/requests